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Úvodní stránka » RECORDS » Conrad Schnitzler — Silber
Conrad Schnitzler — Silber (2013)

 Conrad Schnitzler — Silber (2013)

                  Conrad Schnitzler — Silber
Origin: Düsseldorf, Germany
Genre: Electronic, Ambient, Experimental
Born: 17 March 1937 in Düsseldorf
Died: 4 August 2011 in Berlin
Occupations: Sound designer, Musician, Foley artist, Performing artist
Instruments: Tape recorder, synthesizer, cello, violin, keyboards, drums
Reissue. Originally released 2009.
Recorded: 1974/75
Album release: November 8, 2013
Record Label: Bureau B 149
Duration:     60:45
Tracks:
01. 1      7:38
02. 2      6:34
03. 3     10:20
04. 4      7:20
05. 5      6:30
06. 6 (Bonus)     7:37
07. 7 (Bonus)     6:31
08. 8 (Bonus)     8:15


Conrad Schnitzler (1937–2011), composer and concept artist, is one of the most important representatives of Germany's electronic music avant-garde. A student of Joseph Beuys, he founded Berlin's legendary Zodiak Free Arts Lab, a subculture club, in 1967/68, was a member of Tangerine Dream (together with Klaus Schulze and Edgar Froese) and Kluster (with Dieter Moebius and Hans-Joachim Roedelius) and also released countless solo albums. The silver album is a collection of tracks from Schnitzler's archive, recorded between 1974/75, originally released (on vinyl only) in 2009. It represents Schnitzler's unique and inimitable blueprint for a music of the future, music which still astounds when we hear it today. © Schnitzler during his days as a performance artist, c.1979.
Key facts:
Conrad Schnitzler (1937–2011), composer and concept artist, is
one of the most important representatives of Germany’s
electronic music avant-garde. A student of Joseph Beuys, he
founded Berlin’s legendary Zodiak Free Arts Lab, a subculture
club, in 1967/68, was a member of Tangerine Dream (together
with Klaus Schulze and Edgar Froese) and Kluster (with Dieter
Moebius and Hans-Joachim Roedelius) and also released
countless solo albums.
The silver album is an archive collection of tracks compiled by
Conrad Schnitzler, recorded between 1974/75, originally
released (on vinyl only) by the Italian Label Qbico in 2009.
contains the complete original material (three more tracks than
the 2009 release)
on CD for the first time (with original running order)
Liner notes by Asmus Tietchens
Available on CD (digipak), vinyl (180g) or as download
Just when you think you have grasped Schnitzler’s master plan,
every time you kid yourself into predicting what you are about to
hear, the next record comes along to prove you wrong.
Motorik is writ large throughout. Even the less rhythmic passages
remain grounded, never drifting into absolute abstraction. A more or
less distinct ostinato runs through each track, condensed into a
complex tapestry of electronic surprises amidst Schnitzler’s typical
cascades of sound and flashes of noise.
And so the journey to the most distant corner of Schnitzler’s world
begins! Majestic drones and tricky melodies fly past the listener. Is
this still the music of Schnitzler, the conceptual artist? Yes,
undoubtedly. His view or concept of art allowed him the freedom to
experiment in all directions, a stroke of luck for the listener. The
silver album offers up a form of pop music preempting nothing and
unrelated to anything else. Far more, it represents Schnitzler’s
unique and inimitable blueprint for a music of the future, music which
still astounds when we hear it today, almost forty years later. And it
poses the almost philosophical question, whether this future has
already happened or is yet to happen? Schnitzler was not alone in
daring to create future music in the 1970s; yet many visions of that
era were short-lived and appear rather dusty today, even a little
embarassing. The “precious metal” albums, in contrast, escape the
zeitgeist and are patently resistant to retromaniac constraints.
Schnitzler’s artistic and — let us spell it out — aesthetic autonomy
celebrates a veritable victory here. — Asmus Tietchens

Schnitzler had a radical, sculptural approach to sound, an approach that descended from his time with Beuys and his time spent toiling in factories and engine rooms. During his days as a sailor in West Germany, Schnitzler listened to the radio at night, tuning into the likes of Stockhausen and Nono on Herbert Eimert’s pioneering Neue Musik broadcasts. He drew connections between the music he heard on the radio and the music of the ship engines. ‘He knew the sound of the ship’s engine so intimately, every creak and sound that the engine made,’ says Montgomery. ‘He knew by listening what he had to do to fix it. When the ships would dock in the ports — when they’d shut down for the night – they would have their foghorn signal. I remember him talking about standing on the deck of the ship and hearing this, when the ship would shut down. Basically, it was this fantastic sonic experience for him that was coming from all directions.’ Over the course of his life, Schnitzler tried to recapture that experience of being on the deck of a ship, making music that felt like it was coming from all sides. In his studio, which he painted black, he surrounded himself with speakers.
In the mid-1960s, Schnitzler met Hans-Joachim Roedelius, who became his bandmate in Kluster a few years later. ‘He was like a father to his child to me in Berlin when I was in a miserable situation,’ remembers Roedelius. ‘He motivated me to become an artist.’ Roedelius stayed with Schnitzler’s family for a while. ‘We worked together to earn our living in Berlin,’ says Roedelius, ‘as well as in Corsica, where we worked as roofers building bungalows in a camp for nudists in the mountains.’ Schnitzler’s first musical project, which also involved Roedelius, was called Geräusche, which translates as ‘Noises’ — one can only imagine what they sounded like, because no recordings exist. In 1968, Roedelius and the collective he aligned himself with at the time, Human Being, helped Schnitzler start the Zodiak Free Arts Lab, but Schnitzler was the heart of the project. ‘Con started the Zodiak by himself,’ says Roedelius. ‘We (at the time ‘Human Being’) got involved, but the main activity to find and rent the rooms of this venue came from him. I was in Paris when Con called me to come and help renovate the venue, and when I arrived everything was almost ready, but the Human Being guys (Boris Schaak and Elke Lixfield, mainly) helped Con to do the work.’
Fortaken: Geeta Dayal: http://blog.frieze.com/conrad-schnitzler/
Website: http://www.conrad-schnitzler.de/
Website: http://fancymoon.com/con_s/
Promo contact:
Bureau B
Matthias Kümpflein
Tel. 0049-(0)40-881666-63
matthias@bureau-b.com
Distributor: Indigo
Cat. no.: BB149
EAN CD 4047179805926
LP 4047179805919
Indigo no.: CD 980592
LP 980591
Conrad Schnitzler & Bjørn Hatterud. Photo: Thomas Olsen
Synth. Studio Wannsee 850
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Conrad Schnitzler — Silber (2013)

 

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