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Úvodní stránka » RECORDS II » Daniel Lanois
Daniel Lanois
Flesh and Machine

Daniel Lanois — Flesh and Machine (October 28, 2014)

 Daniel Lanois — Flesh and Machine

    Někdy je dobré vědět, odkud umělec pochází. Geografie může ko–definovat zvuk, ale zatímco Daniel Lanois je z Ontaria, mohl by také pocházet ze Saturnu. Jeho nové album “Flesh and Machine” vzdoruje kategorizaci; nemá žádné písně se slovy, disponuje lidskými hlasy, sloužícími pouze k zajištění textury.
    Exquisite, lush singer–songwriter whose famed production style mirrors his solo work.
Born: September 19, 1951, Hull, Quebec, Canada
Origin: Ancaster, Ontario, Canada
Location: Hull, Quebec, Canada
Album release: October 28, 2014
Record Label: Red Floor Records • Anti Records
Duration:     40:52
Tracks:
01 Rocco     1:30
02 The End     3:35
03 Sioux Lookout     3:52
04 Tamboura Jah     2:52
05 Two Bushas     3:04
06 Space Love     3:51
07 Iceland     2:38
08 My First Love     5:30
09 Opera     3:09
10 Aquatic     4:21
11 Forest City     5:30
Credits:
  Alex Krispin Producer
•••  Daniel Lanois Composer, Steel guitar, Electronics, Producer
•  Matt McNichols Layout
•  Adam Samuels Editing, Mastering
Description:
    Throughout a storied career as a musician, producer and engineer, Daniel Lanois helped push the ambient genre forward into celestial new territory as Brian Eno’s foremost protégé; he has recorded landmark albums for U2 and Peter Gabriel and helped to revitalize the sonic dimensions of Bob Dylan and Neil Young. But Flesh And Machine (out October 28) marks the first time Lanois has truly deployed every sonic weapon in his arsenal and attempted to break virgin ground in support of his own music.
    Flesh And Machine was initially conceived as an ambient album, and tracks such as ‘Forest City’ take the classic Brian Eno albums that he worked on Ambient 4: On Land (1982) and Apollo: Atmospheres And Soundtracks (1983) as a wonderful bedrock to stand on to see the sonic future. The album bristles with new ideas. He spent countless hours processing an array of source sounds — steel and electric guitar, piano and human voice to create the sound palette that is Flesh and Machine.
Daniel Lanois is still raising that spirit of music and still opening up doors to the unknown.
    Flesh & Machine is Daniel Lanois’ seventh or eighth album depending on how one counts them. It contains no “songs,” but rather 11 sonic compositions that have been painstakingly structured from sketch instrumentation (guitars, pedal steel, drums, basses, organs, pianos, an omnichord) and voices (human and otherwise), put through intricate webs of digital processing, editing, and sampling. What started as an ambient album — the tracks “Space Love” and closer “Forest City” are testaments to that — spiraled into something else, a record where the recording studio becomes the instrument of choice. There are precedents in his earlier catalog for almost everything here: the aforementioned cuts recall work he did with Brian Eno on 1982’s Ambient 4: On Land and 1983’s Apollo: Atmospheres & Soundtracks), yet the end result is more scattershot and fragmented. Opener “Rocco” features harmonically layered falsetto voices accompanied by a piano. It’s lovely and lilting but all too brief. “Aquatic” commences as an ambient piece, but its fuzzy pedal steel and wordless vocals drift languidly to explore various tones and harmonics. Though it possesses no real center, it does extend ideas Lanois showcased on Steel, the first album in his Omni Series box.     The frenetic “Opera” showcases live drums accompanying a sped–up, distorted, junglist loop (itself created from live drums) stacked alto voices, a whompy Jim Wilson bassline, and what sounds like variously stretched, striated organ chords. The drumming on “Sioux Lookout” is in the punchy New Orleans funk style with massive tom–tom and snare breaks — one can hear its origins in various songs on For the Beauty of Wynona — while the guitars are silvery and dreamy. “The End” is a tense, squalling, electric guitar and drum jam with Brian Blade playing without restraint.  Photo par GjM Photography     Lanois employs staggering tsunamis of distortion and feedback in his soloing. The romantic waltz “My First Love” uses the same omnichord synth Lanois employed on Apollo. It’s tender and perverse with a deliberate application of schmaltz; it would not be out of place in a David Lynch film. “Two Bushas,” while pretty in its shimmering way, sounds more like an afterthought than an actual idea. And that’s the problem with Flesh & Machine. This rainbow of sonic treatments sound great in a pair of headphones but, though most of the individual pieces are interesting, they fail to gel as an album. Over most of the 2000s, Lanois has proven he’s more interested in experimenting in his laboratory than in songwriting. That’s fine as far as it goes. That said, this kind of work doesn’t make for an album which one is inclined to return to for repeated listening.                                                                           By BOB BOILEN
October 19, 201411:02 PM ET
    Sometimes it helps to know where an artist is from. Geography can define a sound, but while Daniel Lanois is from Ontario, he might as well hail from Saturn. His new album, Flesh And Machine, defies categorization; it has no songs and no words, with voices used only to provide textures.
    For a man who’s produced records for Neil Young, Emmylou Harris, Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan, Peter Gabriel and U2, as well as some brilliant albums of heartfelt songs on his own, Flesh And Machine is a deeply otherworldly adventure. After four decades of making records, Lanois has decided to chase sounds that have never been.
    You can hear Lanois lay the groundwork for Flesh And Machine on two groundbreaking ambient albums with Brian Eno in the early ‘80s, On Land and Apollo: Atmospheres And Soundtracks. But even those records are distant relatives to this one, so put on your headphones for Flesh And Machine and let yourself get lost in a place you've truly never visited. :: http://www.npr.org/                      
Review by Thom Jurek;  Score: **½
    Flesh & Machine is Daniel Lanois’ seventh or eighth album depending on how one counts them. It contains no “songs,” but rather 11 sonic compositions that have been painstakingly structured from sketch instrumentation (guitars, pedal steel, drums, basses, organs, pianos, an omnichord) and voices (human and otherwise), put through intricate webs of digital processing, editing, and sampling. What started as an ambient album — the tracks “Space Love” and closer “Forest City” are testaments to that — spiraled into something else, a record where the recording studio becomes the instrument of choice. There are precedents in his earlier catalog for almost everything here: the aforementioned cuts recall work he did with Brian Eno on 1982’s Ambient 4: On Land and 1983’s Apollo: Atmospheres & Soundtracks), yet the end result is more scattershot and fragmented. Opener “Rocco” features harmonically layered falsetto voices accompanied by a piano. It’s lovely and lilting but all too brief. “Aquatic” commences as an ambient piece, but its fuzzy pedal steel and wordless vocals drift languidly to explore various tones and harmonics. Though it possesses no real center, it does extend ideas Lanois showcased on Steel, the first album in his Omni Series box.     The frenetic “Opera” showcases live drums accompanying a sped–up, distorted, junglist loop (itself created from live drums) stacked alto voices, a whompy Jim Wilson bassline, and what sounds like variously stretched, striated organ chords. The drumming on “Sioux Lookout” is in the punchy New Orleans funk style with massive tom–tom and snare breaks — one can hear its origins in various songs on For the Beauty of Wynona — while the guitars are silvery and dreamy. “The End” is a tense, squalling, electric guitar and drum jam with Brian Blade playing without restraint.     Lanois employs staggering tsunamis of distortion and feedback in his soloing. The romantic waltz “My First Love” uses the same omnichord synth Lanois employed on Apollo. It’s tender and perverse with a deliberate application of schmaltz; it would not be out of place in a David Lynch film. “Two Bushas,” while pretty in its shimmering way, sounds more like an afterthought than an actual idea. And that’s the problem with Flesh & Machine. This rainbow of sonic treatments sound great in a pair of headphones but, though most of the individual pieces are interesting, they fail to gel as an album. Over most of the 2000s, Lanois has proven he’s more interested in experimenting in his laboratory than in songwriting. That’s fine as far as it goes. That said, this kind of work doesn't make for an album which one is inclined to return to for repeated listening. :: http://www.allmusic.com/
Website: http://fleshandmachine.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lanoise
Label: http://redfloorrecords.net/
    In anticipation of this forthcoming release Lanois is proud to team–up with Robert Milazzo of The Modern School of Film to present a breakthrough union of moving–media, sonic design and social architecture. Lanois and The Modern School of Film have enlisted a select number of established international filmmakers to create visual works inspired by the new sonic frontier surveyed in Flesh and Machine. Filmmakers Atom Egoyan The Sweet Hereafter, Mary Harron American Psycho, Kevin Drew of Broken Social Scene, Jim McKay Breaking Bad, Ondi Timoner Dig!, and Adam CK Vollick Here Is What Is have all contributed short–form works to this series with along with more filmmakers to be announced soon. The next level of this project is to find a select number of “undiscovered” filmmakers/artists to contribute and submit films for this one of a kind multi–dimensional hybrid of sound–as–media. Lanois and the Modern School of Film will curate this project and select three of the best films from these submissions to be used alongside the aforementioned directors for the promotion of the album, international screenings and within the live performance setting on the 2014/2015 tour cycle in support of this album.
Discography:
••  1989 Acadie
••  1993 For the Beauty of Wynona
••  1993 Waves of Air
••  1994 Cool Water
••  1996 Sweet Angel Mine
••  1996  Lost in Mississippi (soundtrack)
••  1996  Sling Blade (soundtrack)
••  2003 Shine
••  2004 Rockets
••  2005 Belladonna
••  2007 Here Is What Is
••  2008 The Omni Series (Box Set)
••  2008  Steel
••  2008  Purple Vista
••  2008  Santiago
••  2010 Black Dub
••  2014 Flesh and Machine                                                    
PRODUCTION CREDITS:
••  Demo — Simply Saucer, 1974 (not released commercially until 1989, on the album Cyborgs Revisited)
••  Blues and Sentimental — Jackie Washington, 1976 (As "Dan Lanois")
••  Hobo’s Taunt — Willie P. Bennett, 1977 (Engineered, as "Dan Lanois", with Bob Lanois)
••  More Singable Songs — Raffi, 1977 (Recording credit as "Dan Lanois")
••  Can’t Wait For Summer — Ron Neilson, 1978
••  Choice Cuts — Crackers, 1978 (As "Dan Lanois")
••  Millionaires, 1980 EP (As "Danny Lanois") (included two members of Teenage Head)
••  This is the Ice Age — Martha and the Muffins, 1981
••  Dream Away — Bernie LaBarge, 1981
••  Mama Quilla, KKK, Angry Young Woman3–song 12" Album — 1982, Mama Quilla II
••  Dance After Curfew — Nash the Slash, 1982
••  Danseparc — Martha and the Muffins, 1982
••  Ambient 4/On Land — Brian Eno, 1982
••  Parachute Club — Parachute Club, 1983
••  Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks — Brian Eno, 1983
••  The Pearl — Harold Budd and Brian Eno, 1984
••  Mystery Walk — M + M, 1984
••  The Unforgettable Fire — U2, 1984
••  Secrets and Sins — Luba, 1984
••  Thursday Afternoon — Brian Eno, 1985
••  Hybrid — Michael Brook, 1985
••  Birdy — Peter Gabriel, 1985
••  Voices — Roger Eno, 1985
••  Power Spot — Jon Hassell, 1986
••  So — Peter Gabriel, 1986
••  The Joshua Tree — U2, 1987
••  Robbie Robertson — Robbie Robertson, 1987
••  Acadie — Daniel Lanois, 1989
••  Oh Mercy — Bob Dylan, 1989
••  Yellow Moon — Neville Brothers, 1989
••  Home — Hothouse Flowers, 1990
••  Achtung Baby — U2, 1991
••  Flash of the Spirit — Jon Hassell and Farafina, 1992
••  Us — Peter Gabriel, 1992
••  The Last of the Mohicans — movie soundtrack, 1992
••  For the Beauty of Wynona — Daniel Lanois, 1993
••  Ron Sexsmith — Ron Sexsmith, 1994
••  Wrecking Ball — Emmylou Harris, 1995
••  Night to Night — Geoffrey Oryema, 1996
••  Fever In Fever Out — Luscious Jackson, 1996
••  Time Out of Mind — Bob Dylan, 1997
••  Brian Blade Fellowship — Brian Blade, 1998
••  12 Bar Blues — Scott Weiland, 1998
••  Teatro — Willie Nelson, 1998
••  The Million Dollar Hotel — movie soundtrack, 2000
••  All That You Can’t Leave Behind — U2, 2000
••  La Belle Vista — Harold Budd, 2003 (Secretly recorded in Lanois Los Angeles living room)
••  How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb — U2, 2004 (track "Love and Peace or Else")
••  Dusk & Summer — Dashboard Confessional, 2006 (also produced by Don Gilmore)
••  loudQUIETloud, A film about the pixies — movie soundtrack, 2006
••  Back Where You Belong — Sinéad O’Connor, 2007.
••  Let It Go — Mother Superior, 2007.
••  Snake Road — Bob Lanois, 2006.
••  No Line on the Horizon — U2, 2009 (plus songwriting credits).
••  “Mind Games” & “Night Nurse” — Sinéad O'Connor, 2009.
••  Mercy — Rocco DeLuca and the Burden, 2009.
••  Flamingo — Brandon Flowers, 2010.
••  Le Noise — Neil Young, 2010.
••  Honest Mistake — Jim Wilson, 2012.
••  Battle Born — The Killers, 2012 (co–writer on tracks "The Way It Was", "Heart of a Girl", and "Be Still").
••  Rocco Deluca — producer, august 2014
____________________________________________________________

Daniel Lanois
Flesh and Machine

 

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