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Devo — Live at Max’s Kansas City, November 15, 1977 (2014)

Devo — Live at Max’s Kansas City, November 15, 1977 (April 19th, 2014)

USA Flag Devo — Live at Max’s Kansas City, November 15, 1977
Bob "Bob2" Casale of Devo born: July 14th, 1952
Deceased: February 17th, 2014
Origin: Kent and Akron, Ohio, United States
Album release: April 19th, 2014
Record Label: Jackpot Records/Rykodisc
Technologies: Grado Prestige Gold > Pro-Ject Xpression III > Pro-Ject Speed Box II > Harman Kardon HK-3490 > Tascam DR-100
Duration:     36:42
Tracks:
01 David Bowie Intro     0:08
02 Satisfaction (I Can’t Get No)     3:18
03 Too Much Paranoias     2:19
04 Praying Hands     4:05
05 Uncontrollable Urge     3:27
06 Mongoloid     3:38
07 Smart Patrol / Mr. DNA     7:59
08 Gut Feeling (Slap Your Mammy)     4:41
09 Sloppy     2:58
10 Come Back Jonee     4:09 © Bob Casale Photo of Bob2, circa 1980 Photo credit Jules Bates, Artrouble
Former members:
Bob Casaleguitar, keyboards, backing vocals (1973-1974, 1976–1991, 1996–2014; died 2014)
Bob Lewis — guitar (1973–1974)
Rod Reisman — drums (1973)
Fred Weber — vocals (1973)
Jim Mothersbaugh — electronic percussion (1973–1976)
Alan Myers — drums (1976–1985; died 2013)
David Kendrick — drums (1985–1991, live — 2003)
Current members:
Gerald Casale — bass guitar, vocals, bass synthesizer (1973–1991, 1996–present)
Mark Mothersbaugh — synthesizers, vocals, guitar (1973–1991, 1996–present)
Bob Mothersbaugh — guitar, vocals (1974–1991, 1996–present)
Josh Freese — drums (1996–present)
Current and former live musicians:
Jeff Friedl — drums (2008–present; when Josh Freese is not available)
Neil Taylor — drums (2008)
Pete Parada — drums (2011)
From Jackpot Records:
JACKPOT RECORDS PRESENTS — DEVO — LIVE AT MAX’S KANSAS CITY 11/15/77 LP  — RECORD STORE DAY — APRIL 19TH 2014
♦   November 15th, 1977: Max’s Kansas City – David Bowie is backstage with the 5 self proclaimed ‘spudboys’ from Akron, Ohio waiting for his cue to introduce the band who, in his words were, “The band of the future!”. As time went on it became clear that the future is still waiting to catch up with DEVO.
♦   Working closely with the band and those who were there that night, Jackpot Records brings you this audio time capsule that catapulted DEVO from strange, musical hillbillies toinnovative pioneers overnight.
♦   Now the truth can be told! Available for the first time on vinyl the entire performance, complete with rare, unearthed audio of David Bowie. 
♦   With liner notes written by DEVO Co-founder Gerald V. Casale specifically for this release (which also includes a reproduced early DEVO press bio sheet from 1976), this record will be the perfect compliment for hardcore DEVO collectors, music fans and those who are new to the game. Limited to 2000 copies worldwide. (www.jackpotrecords.com)
Description:
♦   From De-Evolution to Revolution: Rare Devo Show to Be Released in Full for Record Store Day
♦   The rock world was stunned yesterday by the announcement of the sudden passing of Bob Casale, guitarist/keyboardist/engineer for quintessential New Wave outfit Devo. ♦   “Bob 2,” as he was known to scores of fans (“Bob 1″ being guitarist/vocalist Bob Mothersbaugh), was an integral part of one of the quirkiest pop bands of the last century, and his sudden death has left a hole in the hearts of fans everywhere. By sheer coincidence, Devo have been one of the first acts to announce a title for Record Store Day in April 2014, consisting of a pivotal 1977 show being released for the first time in full.
♦   Devo had, of course, been challenging audiences with their maniacally catchy, satirical repertoire for much of the ’70s, from the Kent State University campus the band attended (the nascent band’s mindset turned from purely comedic to somewhat serious with the shooting deaths of several protesting students by National Guardsmen in 1970) to the greater Ohio area and beyond. Their appearance at New York club Max’s Kansas City in November 1977 may have been their most essential to date: the self-proclaimed “spudboys” were introduced that night by none other than David Bowie, who presented them as “the band of the future.” Band co-founder/bassist Gerald Casale would later note that record labels began calling after the performance; ultimately, the group would sign to Stiff Records (who’d put their first self-released singles together on an EP) and then Warner Bros. — their major-label home ever since.
♦   Nine tracks from the Max’s performance made their way onto Rykodisc’s 1992 set DEVO Live: The Mongoloid Years, but the impending release of DEVO Live At Max’s Kansas City 11/15/77 on Jackpot Records will feature the entire show. (Casale’s liner notes for The Mongoloid Years noted that the repertoire on that disc represented “the best of the only audio tapes that escaped total disintegration over the last 15 years.” Jackpot’s note about “working closely with the band and those who were there that night” means that the LP is likely sourced from multiple recordings, including fan-sourced ones.) Casale will write new liner notes; the package will also include a band press bio from 1974. Limited to 2,000 copies, this disc will be available at Record Store Day-participating stores on April 19. Fortaken: http://theseconddisc.com/  Photo: The front and back covers of Devo's first release, the 45rpm single "Mongoloid" b/w "Jocko Homo" (1977), released on the band's Booji Boy Records
_______________________________________________________________
♦   Devo had, of course, been challenging audiences with their maniacally catchy, satirical repertoire for much of the ’70s, from the Kent State University campus the band attended (the nascent band’s mindset turned from purely comedic to somewhat serious with the shooting deaths of several protesting students by National Guardsmen in 1970) to the greater Ohio area and beyond.
♦   Their appearance at New York club Max’s Kansas City in November 1977 may have been their most essential to date: the self-proclaimed “spudboys” were introduced that night by none other than David Bowie, who presented them as “the band of the future.” Band co-founder/bassist Gerald Casale would later note that record labels began calling after the performance; ultimately, the group would sign to Stiff Records (who’d put their first self-released singles together on an EP) and then Warner Bros. — their major-label home ever since.
♦   Nine tracks from the Max’s performance made their way onto Rykodisc’s 1992 set Live: The Mongoloid Years, but the impending release of Live At Max’s Kansas City 11/15/77 on Jackpot Records will feature the entire show. (Casale’s liner notes for The Mongoloid Years noted that the repertoire on that disc represented “the best of the only audio tapes that escaped total disintegration over the last 15 years.” Jackpot’s note about “working closely with the band and those who were there that night” means that the LP is likely sourced from multiple recordings, including fan-sourced ones.)
Website: http://www.clubdevo.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClubDEVO
Press: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/26/alan-myers-dead-dies_n_3504447.html
♦   “As an original member of Devo, Bob Casale was there in the trenches with me from the beginning. He was my level-headed brother, a solid performer and talented audio engineer, always giving more than he got. He was excited about the possibility of Mark Mothersbaugh allowing Devo to play shows again.
His sudden death from conditions that lead to heart failure came as a total shock to us all.”  —  Gerald Casale, Devo founder
♦   "I'm heartbroken about Bob's sudden passing. I will always miss him." — Bob "Bob1" Mothersbaugh, Devo guitarist
♦   "We are shocked and saddened by Bob Casale's passing. He not only was integral in DEVO's sound, he worked over twenty years at Mutato, collaborating with me on sixty or seventy films and television shows, not to mention countless commercials and many video games. Bob was instrumental in creating the sound of projects as varied as Rugrats and Wes Anderson's films. He was a great friend. I will miss him greatly. " — Mark Mothersbaugh, Devo founder
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♦   Devo gained some fame in 1976 when the short film The Truth About De-Evolution by Chuck Statler won a prize at the Ann Arbor Film Festival. In 1977 Devo were asked by Neil Young to participate in the making of his film Human Highway. ♦   Released in 1982, the film featured the band as "Nuclear garbagepersons." The band members were asked to write their own parts and Mark Mothersbaugh scored and recorded much of the soundtrack, his first of many.
♦   In 1976 Devo released their first single "Mongoloid" b/w "Jocko Homo", the B-side of which came from the soundtrack to The Truth About De-Evolution, on their independent label "Booji Boy", followed in 1977 by a cover of the Rolling Stones' "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".
♦   In 1978 the "Be Stiff EP" was released by English independent label Stiff Records, which included the single "Be Stiff" plus two previous Booji Boy releases. "Mechanical Man", a 4 track 7" EP of demos, an apparent bootleg but rumored to be put out by the band themselves, was also released that year.
♦   Devo caught the attention of David Bowie and Iggy Pop, who championed the band and enabled Devo to secure a recording contract with Warner Bros. Records. After Bowie backed out due to previous commitments, their first album, Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! was produced by Brian Eno and featured re-recordings of their previous singles "Mongoloid" and "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction". On October 14, 1978, Devo gained national exposure with an appearance on Saturday Night Live, a week after the Rolling Stones, performing "Satisfaction" and "Jocko Homo."
♦   In 1978, co-founder Bob Lewis asked for credit and compensation for his contributions to the band. The band refused to negotiate, and sued Lewis in Los Angeles Superior Court, seeking a declaratory judgment stating Lewis had no rights to the name or theory of De-evolution. Lewis then filed an action in United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, alleging theft of intellectual property. During discovery, Lewis produced articles, promotional materials, documentary evidence and an interview recorded at the Akron Art Institute following the premiere of In the Beginning was the End in which Mothersbaugh and other band members credited Lewis with developing the theory of de-evolution, and the band quickly settled for an undisclosed sum.

 © Devo, Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 27, 1978 Agora Ballroom, DEVO in Atlanta, Ga. Dec. 27, 1978 Bob Casale and Gerald Casale, Photo credit: Malcolm Riviera
♦   The band followed up with Duty Now for the Future in 1979, which moved the band more towards electronic instrumentation. While not as successful as their first record, it did produce some fan favorites with the songs "Blockhead" and "The Day My Baby Gave Me a Surprize" [sic], as well as a cover of the Johnny Rivers hit "Secret Agent Man". "Secret Agent Man" had been recorded first in 1974 for Devo's first film and performed live as early as 1976. 1979 also brought Devo to Japan for the first time, and a live show from this tour was partially recorded. Devo also appeared on Don Kirshner's Rock Concert in 1979, performing "Blockhead", "Secret Agent Man", "Uncontrollable Urge", and "Mongoloid". Also in 1979 Rhino Records — in conjunction with LA radio station KROQ — released Devotees, a tribute album. It contained a set of covers of DEVO songs interspersed with renditions of popular songs in Devo's style.
♦   Devo actively embraced the Church of the SubGenius. In concert, Devo sometimes performed as their own opening act, pretending to be a Christian soft-rock group called "Dove (the Band of Love)", which is an anagram for "Devo". They appeared as "Dove" in the 1980 televangelism spoof Pray TV. They also recorded music, later released on the CD E-Z Listening Disc (1987), with Muzak style versions of their own songs to play before their concerts.
♦   Devo gained a new level of visibility with 1980's Freedom of Choice which included their best-known hit, "Whip It", which quickly became a Top 40 hit. The album moved to an almost completely electronic sound, with the exception of acoustic drums and Bob 1's guitar. The tour for "Freedom of Choice" featured the band performing in front of large custom light boxes which could be laid on their back to form a second, smaller stage during the second half of the set. Other popular songs from "Freedom of Choice" were "Girl U Want," the title track (both of which had popular music videos, along with "Whip It"), and "Gates of Steel". Devo made two appearances on the TV show Fridays in 1980, as well as on Don Kirchner's Rock Concert, American Bandstand, and other shows.
Deaths:
♦   Alan Myers died of stomach cancer in Los Angeles, California on June 24, 2013. He was 58 years old. News reports at the time of his death incorrectly cited brain cancer as the cause.
♦   Bob Casale died on February 17, 2014 at the age of 61; according to his brother Gerald, it was a "sudden death from conditions that led to heart failure."
Discography:
♦   Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo! (1978)
♦   Duty Now for the Future (1979)
♦   Freedom of Choice (1980)
♦   New Traditionalists (1981)
♦   Oh, No! It's Devo (1982)
♦   Shout (1984)
♦   Total Devo (1988)
♦   Smooth Noodle Maps (1990)
♦   Something for Everybody (2010)
© Photo credit: Alan Myers (far left) with the band Devo, circa 1980 (Credit: Anne Fishbein/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
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Devo — Live at Max’s Kansas City, November 15, 1977 (2014)

 

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