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Úvodní stránka » GREAT BOOK TAIS AWARDS » Jack Palmer and Amanda Palmer
Jack Palmer and Amanda Palmer — You Got Me Singing (July 15, 2016)

Jack Palmer and Amanda Palmer — You Got Me Singing (July 15, 2016)

 Jack Palmer and Amanda Palmer You Got Me Singing (July 15, 2016)Jack Palmer and Amanda Palmer — You Got Me Singing (July 15, 2016)↔   Autorka nejhorší básně všech dob má venku se svým tátou album plné zajímavých coververzí málokdy odvysílaných písní, včetně mírně zlověstné, viktoriánské, dětské říkanky “Wynken, Blynken and Nod” a “1952 Vincent Black Lightning” — vrcholné ódy na motocykl od Richarda Thompsona. THE TIMES, které mají 400.000 předplatitelů (navíc obdržely 31x Journalist Awards, 6x Newspaper Awards, 5x Story Awards a 2x Team Awards a má neocenitelné archivy sahající až 200 let zpátky) dává albu vysoké hodnocení. Jack Palmer, who is 72 and sings choral music regularly for the National Cathedral in Washington DC, says “I believe nothing is more powerful than love, and that nothing expresses it better than singing. It was one of Amanda’s songs that began healing our fractured relationship. Years later, I hope the love that went into this project will perhaps touch listeners in the same way.”
↔   Amanda Palmer and (her father) Jack Palmer are set to release You Got Me Singing, a lovingly put together album, on Friday 15 July. Amanda sings, and plays piano and ukulele, and Jack, a semi–professional choral singer, plays guitar and lends his rich bass voice to a variety of cover songs that span decades. “The main inspiration behind this record was to share songs and time with my dad” says Amanda, who was separated from her father when she was less than a year old, “It was a really good reason to spend healing time together, sharing our musical histories, all poetically punctuated by the fact that I was 7 months pregnant when we recorded. I knew that from my post at the mixing desk and the mic, this music was being heard in the womb, and so the song selection was really important…we didn’t want this album to sound corny, we wanted it to sound like the connective tissue between three generations. The songs had to be simple.”Birth name: Amanda MacKinnon Palmer
Also known as: Amanda Fucking Palmer
Born: April 30, 1976, New York City, New York, U.S.
Location: Boston, MA & New York City, NY
Instruments: Vocals, keyboard, piano, ukulele, harmonica
Album release: July 15, 2016
Record Label: Eight Foot Records/Cooking Vinyl
Genre: Americana, Alternative / Punk Cabaret
Duration:     47:54
Tracks:
01. You Got Me Singing      2:23
02. Wynken, Blynken and Nod      3:08
03. Again      3:22
04. 1952 Vincent Black Lightning      4:34
05. Louise Was Not Half Bad      3:17
06. Black Boys on Mopeds      3:52
07. All I Could Do      3:38
08. In The Heat of the Summer      3:00
09. Pink Emerson Radio      4:58
10. Skye Boat Song      3:52
11. Glacier      7:22
12. I Love You So Much      4:28
© 2016 Eight Foot Records
Personnel:
↔   Amanda Palmer Glockenspiel, Mellotron, Piano, Ukulele, Vibraphone, Vocals
↔   Jack Palmer Guitar, Vocals
↔   Joe Costa Engineer, Mixing, Tambourine, Thunder Sheet
↔   Kyle Cassidy Photography
↔   Emily Weiland Design
↔   Rob Stein Pedal Steel
Authors:
01. You Got Me Singing (Leonard Cohen)
02. Wynken, Blynken and Nod (Lucy & Carly Simon)
03. Again (Melanie)
04. 1952 Vincent Black Lightning (Richard Thompson)
05. Louise Was Not Half Bad (Tom T Hall)
06. Black Boys on Mopeds (Sinead O’Connor)
07. All I Could Do (Kimya Dawson)
08. In The Heat of the Summer (Phil Ochs)
09. Pink Emerson Radio (Kathleen Edwards)
10. Skye Boat Song (traditional)
11. Glacier (John Grant)
12. I Love You So Much (Noah Britton)
↔   The album was engineered by Joe Costa at Middletree studio in Nashville and recorded at Dreamland Studio in rural upstate New York.
Description:
↔   2016 debut collaboration between ex–Dresden Dolls vocalist Amanda Palmer & her dad Jack, covering songs by Leonard Cohen, John Grant, Richard Thompson, Sinead O’Connor, Phil Ochs & others!
Review
Will Hodgkinson, July 15 2016, 12:01am, The Times / Score: ****
↔   http://www.thetimes.co.uk/
Review
Kate Hutchinson, Thursday 14 July 2016 21.45 BST / Score: ****
↔   Amanda Palmer has long been divisive – dedicating poems to bombing suspects, dressing up like a conjoined twin, doing things that make outraged think–piece writers jiggle with glee. Her latest album, however, a collection of folk, blues, country and contemporary covers with her once–estranged 72–year–old dad Jack, strikes the right chord. Sometimes old songs shine a startling light on the present. Judy Collins’s folk ditty In the Heat of the Summer, about the 1964 Harlem riots, is recast with doom-laden gusto. Jack leads John Grant’s marvellous lament about gay struggle, Glacier. And Amanda’s cover of Sinéad O’Connor’s 1983 comment on police brutality, Black Boys on Mopeds, is chillingly poignant. At times the covers err too much on the side of I’m–vaudevillian–me theatricality, even if in just the dramatic gothic piano runs. But the real star here is Jack, whose gravelly vocal lends the album a Man in Black–like gravitas. Their voices intertwine beautifully, Amanda’s smoky lightness to Jack’s baritone, and none better than on the title track by Leonard Cohen, a song filled with regret but tinged with possibility.  :::   https://www.theguardian.com/
Review
Words: Laurence Day / 16 MAY 2016, 14:00 BST
↔   On the LP, which comprises a range of meaningful covers, both Amanda and Jack share vocal duties — the elder Palmer is a semi–professional choral singer for the National Cathedral in Washington DC.
↔   You Got Me Singing was created “to share songs and time with my dad” says Amanda, who was seven months pregnant during the recording. “It was a really good reason to spend healing time together, sharing our musical histories... I knew that from my post at the mixing desk and the mic, this music was being heard in the womb, and so the song selection was really important... we didn’t want this album to sound corny, we wanted it to sound like the connective tissue between three generations. The songs had to be simple.”
↔   Jack adds: “I believe nothing is more powerful than love, and that nothing expresses it better than singing. It was one of Amanda’s songs that began healing our fractured relationship. Years later, I hope the love that went into this project will perhaps touch listeners in the same way.”
You Got Me Singing — Leonard Cohen
↔   The album came about because I invited my dad on stage to guest with me every time I came through DC, solo. After the third time I suggested we record for posterity and come up with a bunch of covers. In DC, we would cover Leonard Cohen songs, the very center of the Venn diagram of where our music heroes and collections collide... and though the original songs we covered didn’t make the cut (“Night Comes On”, “One of Us Cannot Be Wrong”), my dad suggested this one as a perfect capstone to a father/daughter collaboration. It’s literal. We got each other singing, for sure.
Wynken, Blynken and Nod — Simon Sisters
↔   I’d never heard this song, and my dad, in a move that was emotionally way out of character for him, sent me a phone recording of him singing this song, voice with guitar, for my birthday when I was pregnant with Little Anthony. I fell in love with his rendition and suggested we put it on the record. Even better was when I found out the song’s origin story: it was a poem by Eugene Field arranged by a young Lucy Simon (Carly’s sister) when she was, I think, 15. Then the sisters sang it as a duet. This wound up being one of my favorite tracks on the record; it’s such a perfect lullaby for a baby about to pop out of the womb... and my dad (when he’s babysitting) currently claims that when he sings it, it puts the baby to sleep. Score!!!
Again — Melanie
↔   This one came, totally synchronically, about a month before we went into the studio. My artist housemate Cassandra, who often sends me good music she finds, emailed me this YouTube clip of a rare Melanie song. I thought it was absolutely perfect for the collection and this one was the most fun for overdubs in the studio — I got to use the beautiful old mellotron and every other mallet instrument in the room: glockenspiel and vibes. Such a perfect lonely song — but when your dad’s playing guitar on your lonely song, everything feels less lonely.
1952 Vincent Black Lightning — Richard Thompson
↔   I was introduced to Richard Thompson a few summers ago during Edinburgh Fringe time, when our family friends The Cunninghams took me to see him at Queen’s Hall and I fell instantly in love... especially with the songs “Beeswing” and “1952 Vincent Black Lightning”, which became a dual companion of comforting songs as I went through a hard year of loss. I suggested this one to my dad, who’d never heard it, and I knew I’d get my dad hooked because it’s a MOTORCYCLE song and my dad is a motorcycle lover… but what a perfect story to divide up into two voices. Richard’s guitar playing is, of course next level, so instead of trying to replicate the guitar playing we decided to be tricky and convert it to piano and a slightly different rhythm. I hope Richard approves.
Louise Was Not Half Bad — Tom T. Hall
↔   “Louise...” came from my dad’s collection of oldies — it was just a favorite of his to sing and play, and I begged for it to make the cut because it shows off his Johnny Cash voice so beautifully.
Black Boys on Mopeds — Sinead O’Connor
↔   I Do Not Want What I Have Not Got was one of my most–played albums as a young teenager, and "Black Boys On Mopeds” was one of my favorite songs from it. Sinead’s unapologetic bravery as a singer and songwriter fueled me back then and revisiting her songs is enlightening for me as a songwriter, especially cast against the lack of political progress of today’s landscape, because I barely understood what she was talking about when I was listening to that record at age 13. It’s a protest song; like so many things I listened to that I didn’t realize were just folk songs disguised as alternative music.
All I Could Do — Kimya Dawson
↔   I heard this Kimya Dawson song a few years before I was pregnant and burst into tears because I could so easily relate. I suggested it for this record because I wanted to sing it with Dad — guitar, for superstitious luck.
In The Heat Of The Summer — Phil Ochs
↔   This one was my dad’s pick. I wasn’t hip to Phil Ochs until he suggested this track, and then I researched (One of the best things about this album was the music I discovered) and then my dad asked if it was possible that he rewrite/modernize some of the lyrics — and I was so proud ... my dad’s poetic side coming out! We had to get publishing permissions (which we did, thankfully), and I was so proud of his changes — he nailed it.
Pink Emerson Radio — Kathleen Edwards
↔   I found Kathleen when I was in my mid–twenties when she put out Failer. This song is such a guitar song, and as I wanted to rep a few more of my contemporary female songwriters, this seemed perfect. I love how this song is the perfect story — you have no idea where it’s going until that last line. Also, we made use of the vast array of great musicians in upstate New York and engaged Rob Stein on pedal steel, who waltzed into the studio and did these songs in two takes each.
Skye Boat Song — Traditional
↔   My grandmother, Christina Beaton, emigrated with her mother and siblings from the Isle Of Skye as a teenager, losing her brother in passage to illness and landing in New York City, where she met my grandfather (Alfred Mockett) who was an immigrant from Deal, Kent. They made a life in New York and gave birth to my mother not long after. My own parents’ divorce (they separated when I was nine months) is something I’ll always be trying to heal and patch up through my own art and experience. This song threads together my mother’s origin story through my father’s voice. It’s also just such a beautiful tune — I sometimes get weepy thinking about that goddamn boat ride.
Glacier — John Grant
↔   I heard about John Grant because of his song “Queen Of Denmark”, which my best friend Anthony sent me over email in a YouTube link. I was like: “Who IS this incredibly brave songwriter?” I researched his work and found multiple song gems, and nothing hit me in the gut like “Glacier”. I wanted some songs on the album that were NEW, so I suggested to my dad we attack it. Meanwhile, John Grant invited me to sing on his new record (on the track “You & Him”) so the whole world is full circle, yo.
I Love You So Much — Noah Britton
↔   Noah was a friend’s ex–boyfriend in Boston, known for his comedy troupe “Aspergers R Us” (he’s Autistic) and his painfully honest songwriting. I’ve played it live and always wanted to cover this song in a recording. I figured I could get away with making it a dad record song… and it worked perfectly. Especially as a way to end a record.
↔   http://www.thelineofbestfit.com/
Website: http://amandapalmer.net/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/amandapalmer
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/amandapalmer
Jon Ronson interview, Saturday 22 June 2013, 09.00 BST: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/jun/22/amanda-palmer-visionary-egotist-interview

© **Exclusive** / Amanda Palmer of “he Dresden Dolls” plays an intimate outdoor gig in Meeting House Square in Temple Bar Dublin, Ireland — 26. 09. 2008. Credit: (Mandatory): WENN

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Jack Palmer and Amanda Palmer — You Got Me Singing (July 15, 2016)

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