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Jenny Gillespie
Cure for Dreaming (January 29, 2016)

Jenny Gillespie — Cure for Dreaming (January 29, 2016)

  Jenny Gillespie — Cure for Dreaming (January 29, 2016)Jenny Gillespie — Cure for Dreaming (January 29, 2016) ★  “Lék na snění” je hluboké album. Je to intenzivní album. Ne však v tom smyslu, že by bylo těžké nebo hlasité, spíše pro to, že vyžaduje koncentraci. Nakonec však z toho budeš těžit maximum. Máš na to, abys do něj investoval více než obvyklou pozornost? Čím odměňuje? Způsobem frázování, dramatičností v nedořečeném, ponecháním prostoru posluchači a jeho abstrakci, představivosti a snění, aby dosáhl cíle společně s původcem toho všeho. Vrstvené, přesto odlišné kytarové party, proplétající se mezi sebou navzájem a nad tím vším (Chris Bruce: ac + el. g., Gerry Leonard: el. g., Greg Leisz: pedal steel, Jamie Edwards: piano, synth, Wurlitzer, Moog / basklarinet, flétna, hoboj), měkká a tím  ještě naléhavější vokální preciznost Gillespie se dostává do popředí zájmu, protože si všímá předmětu písně, ne efektu. Dívá se na život, ne do zrcadla. Pokud pro titul alba využila knihu od Cat Winters, nic proti ničemu, i v ní jde o ‘tvrdohlavou’ a nezávislou dívku. Všimni si tohoto detailu v jejím zpěvu: “laughing all the way...,  to your last mystery train” (“Last Mystery Train”).  Okamžitě podávám petici a požaduji, aby tato píseň byla poskytnuta radio–frekvencím s cílem všudypřítomnosti. Poslouchat toto je jako být přepraven do jiného světa, kde světlo a tma jsou vybalancované tak akorát a možnosti jsou nekonečné. Nech se vtáhnout dovnitř a jediným zklamáním bude pravděpodobně ta zkušenost, že když to skončí a ty si uvědomíš, že ve skutečnosti sedíš někde u stolu, asi nenajdeš slova dostatečně vhodná k popsání radosti, protože nechat všechno být a jen poslouchat je skutečný život. Jenny Gillespie je zase zpátky a silnější než kdy jindy. Vskutku, její hudební přístup ke zkoumání Ameriky je inspirující, Gillespie zkoumá symbolickou krásu a historickou spiritualitu její domovské země. Celkově lze říci: album je pečlivě vytvořené umělecké dílo a rozhodně stojí za poslech. “Jenny Gillespie seems to be a musician growing ever more comfortable with who she is. I imagine her as someone who’d love you to love her music, but from whom it would continue to pour our regardless of whether or not anyone ever responded to it. A true artist.”Location: San Francisco, California
Genre: California rock
Album release: January 29, 2016
Record Label: Narooma Records
Duration:     35:08
Tracks:
1 Dhyana by the River     4:56
2 No Stone     2:39
3 Part Potawatomi     4:47
4 Evening Loving     4:01
5 Last Mystery Train     5:47
6 Involuntary Sway     3:43
7 His Voyage Innocent     5:06
8 Pain Travels (Chakra Huckster)     4:09
℗ 2016 Narooma
Band:
★  Jenny: vocals, synth, Mellotron, Wurlitzer
★  Jamie Edwards: piano, synth, Wurlitzer, Moog
★  Chris Bruce: acoustic and electric guitar
★  Paul Bryan: bass, Mellotron, chamberlain
★  Jay Bellerose: drums
★  Greg Leisz: pedal steel
★  Gerry Leonard: electric guitar
details:
★  Paul Bryan (Aimee Mann),
★  Jay Bellerose drummer (Robert Plant and Allison Krauss),
★  Chris Bruce guitarist (Meshell Ndgeocello),
★  Gerry Leonard guitarist (David Bowie)
★  Greg Leisz pedal steel player (Lucinda Williams, Bon Iver).
Credits:
★  Mixed by Ryan Freeland at Stampede Origin, LA
★  Mastered by Kim Rosen at Knack, Ridgewood, New Jersey                                                          © Song: “Slow Runner” Photo
Description:
★  Long before Tori Amos started writing about fairies and mysticism, she was one of the ‘90s most original musicians to ever take a spot behind a piano. Judging from her latest, Cure for Dreaming, Jenny Gillespie may be the second coming of Amos.
★  A press release notes that “themes of motherhood, marriage, spirituality and dying enter into the music,” but are conveyed “through the medium of playful, imagistic and conversational language.”
★  Backing Gillespie is a band made up of Paul Bryan (Aimee Mann), drummer Jay Bellerose (Robert Plant and Allison Krauss), guitarist Chris Bruce (Meshell Ndgeocello), guitarist Gerry Leonard (David Bowie), and pedal steel player Greg Leisz (Lucinda Williams, Bon Iver). Their warm, gentle arrangements are a perfect complement to Gillespie’s soft, smooth vocals.
★  The songs span a variety of landscapes, from the Venice boardwalk with its “chakra hucksters” to a woman’s solitary spiritual rebirth on the banks of an East Coast river in “Dhyana by the River.” Themes of motherhood, marriage, spirituality and dying enter into the music but through the medium of playful and conversational language. Characters weave in and out of the songs, such as the brooding loner drawn to the masculine expressions of his ancestry of “Part Potawatomi”, or the cheerful artist facing death in “Last Mystery Train.” The music is loose, warm, and memorable, yet pulls off an undercurrent of occasional instrumental and melodic wildness not often found in modern day pop.
By Calum Slingerland, Published Jan 25, 2016
★  San Francisco songwriter Jenny Gillespie is set to release her new album Cure for Dreaming, and Exclaim! is giving you a chance to hear the forthcoming record in its entirety a week before release.
★  Recorded in the fall of 2015 in Los Angeles, Cure for Dreaming sees Gillespie blend her earnest folk roots with jazz, as well as ’60s– and ’70s–leaning pop. A press release notes that “themes of motherhood, marriage, spirituality and dying enter into the music,” but are conveyed “through the medium of playful, imagistic and conversational language.”
★  Backing Gillespie is a band made up of Paul Bryan (Aimee Mann), drummer Jay Bellerose (Robert Plant and Allison Krauss), guitarist Chris Bruce (Meshell Ndgeocello), guitarist Gerry Leonard (David Bowie), and pedal steel player Greg Leisz (Lucinda Williams, Bon Iver). Their warm, gentle arrangements are a perfect complement to Gillespie’s soft, smooth vocals. ★  http://exclaim.ca/
Also:
By Haydon Spenceley, February 1st, 2016;  Score: 8/10
★  ‘Last Mystery Train’, the fifth track from Jenny Gillespie’s Cure for Dreaming is lilting and sweeping. A light and percussive piano part alternately twinkles and shimmers. Jay Bellerose’s drums undulate gently, first as the snare is barely touched by brushes and then, as the song reaches its muscular crescendo, with a beautiful show of controlled force. Layered, yet distinct guitar parts intertwine with each other, and over it all, Gillespie’s soft yet insistent vocal delivery takes centre stage, as she spots the subject of the song “laughing all the way..., to your last mystery train”. The way the last words of the phrase are left hanging is dramatic. What’s coming? But when they do come the satisfaction of the resolved musicality of the hook, if it can be called that, is so intense that I’m immediately clamouring for this song to be granted radio-airplayed ubiquity. Listening to it is like being transported to another world, where light and dark are balanced and possibilities are endless. Let yourself be drawn in and the only disappointment you’re likely to experience is when it ends and you realise that you are in fact sitting at a desk, seeking to find words worthy enough to describe the joy of letting it all wash over you.
★  Cure for Dreaming is a deep album. It is an intense album. Not in the sense of being heavy or loud, more that it requires concentration. You’ll benefit from it if you invest in it. I should know. The first couple of times I listened, I was trying to do other things at the same time and it seemed to wash over me. A complex suite of songs, ranging from the slinky ‘No Stone’, to the unexpectedly joyous ‘His Voyage Innocent’, it is all too easy to miss the incredible level of musicality at play here. I found it hard to digest upon ‘casual’ listening, but, sitting down properly, was astounded simply by how much there is here to eulogise over.
★  Take, for instance the jazz–tinged ‘Part–Patawotomi’. It is built around a gorgeous breathy set of vocal harmonies, a crisp but spot on acoustic guitar lick and a beautiful recurring bass riff. It widens its palette to include sumptuous strings, and as it reaches the climax of what could loosely be called its chorus, it resolves wonderfully from minor to major, in an unforseen but glorious moment. It’s the sort of song that comes along all too infrequently.
★  As I try vainly to think of what to compare it to, the closest I can find is the chamber pop of Jonathan Wilson, another singular talent who, to me at least, as yet remains criminally underrated. Like Wilson, Jenny Gillespie seems to be a musician growing ever more comfortable with who she is. I imagine her as someone who’d love you to love her music, but from whom it would continue to pour our regardless of whether or not anyone ever responded to it. A true artist.
★  So, where are we then? I’m chastising myself for not listening well enough in my early relationship with this album. I’m encouraging, no I’m begging that you don’t make the same mistake I did and give this resonant piece of work your full attention, the kind of attention it deserves. You won’t be disappointed. ★  http://drownedinsound.com/
Rowan Bennett, January 27, 2016
★  http://weareunseenpress.com/2016/01/27/review-jenny-gillespie-cure-for-dreaming/
Bandcamp: https://jennygillespie.bandcamp.com/album/cure-for-dreaming
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ouestjenny
Label: http://www.naroomarecords.com/
Website: http://jennygillespie.com/ / Reverbnation: https://www.reverbnation.com/jennygillespieA BIT MORE ABOUT JENNY:
★  “Very pleasant to listen to and sort of not at the same time.” — Popped Culture UK Perhaps the best description of what Jenny’s music does to the listener. A blend of beauty and strangeness, soothing and off–kilter. Bits of folk, jazz, electronica and rock woven together in an experimental yet accessible honeycomb hybrid of sound. And with each new project, a simultaneous expansion and shedding of what’s come before.
★  Jenny Gillespie was born in Springfield, IL in 1980 and grew up in a rural setting outside of town, surrounded by woods and water. There was a lot of time spent making fairy houses with twigs and moss. And a lot of harmonizing in the backseat with her sister, a gifted pianist. First picking up her artist mother’s Martin guitar at 13, she found she could put her little poems to music. The local record store clerk had also given 13 year old Jenny the holy trinity of female 90s songwriters: Tori Amos, Sarah McLachlan, and Shawn Colvin. Her songwriting started to bloom and ever since the garden hasn’t stopped flowering.
★  After living in Virginia, Paris, and Texas, Jenny settled in Chicago where she produced her first folk–and–alt–country influenced album LIGHT YEAR in 2009 at Electrical Audio. The album was met with pleasant reviews from the blogoshere, and through its exposure in 2010 she met Darwin Smith, an Austin, TX multi–instrumentalist. At this point Jenny yearned to make something more suited to her own tastes — electronica, experimental, spacious. The two recorded KINDRED at an old house in Wilmette, IL, along with Steve Moore (Tift Merritt, Laura Veirs) and Dony Wynn (Robert Plant) a lush and strange record that started Jenny on a more eccentric songwriting and recording path. In 2010 Jenny left her longtime job as a children’s literature editor at Cricket Magazine to write and perform music in earnest.
★  She booked her own tour to promote Kindred throughout the Midwest, West Coast, and NYC. Wanting to refine and expand her musical palette, and inspired by a volunteer trip to Kenya, Jenny enrolled in African guitar fingerpicking at the Old Town School of Folk Music, and noticed her songwriting began to change even more — stranger rhythms and a return to her guitar. Meanwhile, in 2011, she’d begun her MFA in Poetry at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina. This program’s rigorous study of writing craft would inevitably shake up her lyric writing. But the lure of elsewhere and new collaborators once again proved fertile for Jenny’s music–making. In fall 2011, she traveled to NYC to work with the talented multi–instrumentalist Shahzad Ismaily (Lou Reed, Bonnie Prince Bily, St. Vincent) after Ismaily heard Jenny perform a cover of Sam Amidon’s “Saro.” The resulting work, the BELITA EP, released in spring 2012 on Chicago–based Narooma Records, is another exciting shift in Jenny’s output, an alluring hybrid of folk, African and Asian tones and rhythms, and pop. Ismaily, Amidon’s longtime bandmate, invited Amidon to sing on Jenny’s EP, as well as Marc Ribot who plays guitar on “Sunshine Blood.”
★  Jenny is currently recording a new album CHAMMA with the musicians Joe Adamik (Califone, Iron & Wine), Emmett Kelly (Bonnie Prince Billy), Steve Moore and Arnulf Lindner (Ed Harcourt, Heather Nova.) She is now based in San Francisco, CA._____________________________________________________________

Jenny Gillespie
Cure for Dreaming (January 29, 2016)

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