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John Carpenter — Lost Themes

John Carpenter — Lost Themes (February 3rd, 2015)

        John Carpenter — Lost Themes John Carpenter — Lost Themes °   “Jeden z největších hororových režisérů všech dob.” — New York Times
°   John Carpenter, the Legendary Director and Composer behind Halloween, Escape From New York, They Live, Assault on Precinct 13 and many more announces his debut solo album ‘Lost Themes’ out February 3rd on Sacred Bones Records. In anticipation of his debut release, Carpenter shares a new track “Vortex,” a custom–designed video for “Vortex” set to clips from different Carpenter films and the full album artwork and track list. John Howard Carpenter

Born: January 16, 1948, Carthage, New York, United States
Location:
Album release: February 3rd, 2015
Record Label: Sacred Bones Records
Duration:     78:41
Tracks:
01 Vortex     4:45
02 Obsidian     8:24
03 Fallen     4:45
04 Domain     6:34
05 Mystery     4:36
06 Abyss     6:07
07 Wraith     4:30
08 Purgatory     4:39
09 Night     3:39
10 Night (Zola Jesus and Dean Hurley Remix)     3:39
11 Wraith (ohGr Remix)     3:51
12 Vortex (Silent Servant Remix)     5:10
13 Fallen (Blanck Mass Remix)     6:29
14 Abyss (JG Thirlwell Remix)     5:29
15 Fallen (Bill Kouligas Remix)     6:14
2014 Rodeo Suplex, Inc. d/b/a Rodeo Suplex Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records.
Description:
°   John Carpenter has been responsible for much of the horror genre’s most striking soundtrack work in the fifteen movies he’s both directed and scored. The themes can instantly flood his fans’ musical memory with imagery of a menacing shape stalking a babysitter, a relentless wall of ghost–filled fog, lightning–fisted kung fu fighters, or a mirror holding the gateway to hell. The all–new music on Lost Themes asks Carpenter’s acolytes to visualize their own nightmares.
°   “Lost Themes was all about having fun,” Carpenter says. “It can be both great and bad to score over images, which is what I’m used to. Here there were no pressures. No actors asking me what they’re supposed to do. No crew waiting. No cutting room to go to. No release pending. It’s just fun. And I couldn’t have a better set–up at my house, where I depended on (collaborators) Cody (Carpenter, of the band Ludrium) and Daniel (Davies, who wrote the songs for I, Frankenstein) to bring me ideas as we began improvising. The plan was to make my music more complete and fuller, because we had unlimited tracks. I wasn’t dealing with just analogue anymore. It’s a brand new world. And there was nothing in any of our heads when we started other than to make it moody.”
°   As is Carpenter’s style, repetition is the key to the thundering power of these tracks, their energy swirling with shredding chords, soaring organs, unnerving pianos and captivating percussion. Horror fans will be reminded of Carpenter’s past works, as well as ancestors like Mike Oldfeld’s Tubular Bells and Goblin’s Suspiria.
°   “They’re little moments of score from movies made in our imaginations,” Carpenter says.  “Now I hope it inspires people to create films that could be scored with this music.”
John Carpenter
°   John Carpenter has been responsible for much of the horror genre’s most striking soundtrack work in the fifteen movies he’s both directed and scored. The themes that drive them can be stripped to a few coldly repeating notes, take on the electrifying thunder of a rock concert, or submerge themselves into exotic, unholy miasmas. It’s work that instantly floods his fans’ musical memory with imagery of a menacing shape stalking a babysitter, a relentless wall of ghost–filled fog, lightning–fisted kung fu fighters, or a mirror holding the gateway to hell.
°   The son of a music professor, Carpenter attended the University of Southern California when the sounds of progressive, synthesizer–driven rock were on the horizon. It was with the minimal, iconic music of Halloween where Carpenter truly broke through as a major director — and film musician. Composers before him had used minimalism to create terror, whether it was two piano notes for a killer shark or the stabbing strings of a mother–obsessed psychopath, but it was Halloween’s brilliantly interwoven synth melodies that truly took genre scoring to a new, more sinister level.
°   Perhaps no musical venture has given John Carpenter as much satisfaction as repairing to his home studio in the company of son Cody (of the band Ludrium) and godson Daniel Davies (who composed the songs for I, Frankenstein). This family affair has resulted in Lost Themes, a collection of nine chilling tracks that highlight Carpenter’s range as a composer.
Label: http://www.sacredbonesrecords.com/
Also:
:: http://www.newonvinyl.com/en/john-carpenter-lost-themes.html
Website: http://theofficialjohncarpenter.com/
Techniques:
°   His films are characterized by minimalist lighting and photography, static cameras, use of steadicam, and distinctive synthesized scores (usually self–composed).
°   With the exception of The Thing, Starman, Memoirs of an Invisible Man, and The Ward, he has scored all of his films (though some are collaborations), most famously the themes from Halloween and Assault on Precinct 13. His music is generally synthesized with accompaniment from piano and atmospherics.
°   Carpenter is an outspoken proponent of widescreen filming, and all of his theatrical movies (with the exception of Dark Star and The Ward) were filmed anamorphic with a 2.35:1 or greater aspect ratio. The Ward was shot in Super 35, the first time Carpenter has ever used that system. Carpenter has stated he feels that the 35mm Panavision anamorphic format is "the best movie system there is", preferring it over both digital and 3D film.
Personal life:
°   Carpenter met his future wife, actress Adrienne Barbeau, on the set of his 1978 television movie Someone's Watching Me!. Carpenter was married to Barbeau from January 1, 1979 to 1984. During their marriage, Barbeau starred in The Fog, and also appeared in Escape from New York. The couple had one son, John Cody Carpenter (born May 7, 1984).
°   Carpenter has been married to producer Sandy King since 1990. King produced a number of Carpenter's later feature films, including They Live, In the Mouth of Madness, Ghosts of Mars, and Escape from L.A. She also functioned as script supervisor for some of these films as well, such as Starman, Big Trouble in Little China and Prince of Darkness.
°   He appeared in an episode of Animal Planet's Animal Icons titled "It Came from Japan", where he discussed his love and admiration for the original Godzilla film.
°   Carpenter is also a known supporter of video games as a media and art form and has a particular liking for the F.E.A.R. franchise in general, even going as far as offering himself as a spokesman and helping direct the cinematics for the third game.
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John Carpenter — Lost Themes

 

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