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Kaleidoscope  Incredible / Bernice [Expanded Edition] (2018)

Kaleidoscope — Incredible / Bernice [Expanded Edition] (2018)     Kaleidoscope — Incredible / Bernice [Expanded Edition] (2018)
≡★≡      Kaleidoscope (originally The Kaleidoscope) was an American psychedelic folk and ethnic band who recorded 4 albums and several singles for Epic Records between 1966 and 1970. The band membership included David Lindley, who later released numerous solo albums and won additional renown as a multi~instrumentalist session musician.
Location:  Los Angeles, California, United States

Styles: Folk~Rock, Psychedelic/Garage
Album release: June, 1969 / March, 1970
Record Label: Edsel
Duration:     30:02 / 35:15
Tracks:
INCREDIBLE!
01. Lie to Me
02. Let the Good Love Flow
03. Killing Floor
04. Petit Fleur
05. Banjo
06. Cuckoo
07. Seven~Ate Sweet
08. Sefan (Single Version)
Written by:
≡★≡      Stuart Brotman / Solomon Feldthouse / Paul Lagos / David Lindley / Templeton Parcely     1
≡★≡      David Lindley     2, 5
≡★≡      Traditional     6
≡★≡      Solomon Feldthouse / Paul Lagos / David Lindley / Templeton Parcely     7
BERNICE
01. Chocolate Whale
02. Another Lover
03. Sneakin’ Thru the Ghetto
04. To Know Is Not to Be
05. Lulu Arfin Nanny
06. Lie and Hide
07. Ballad of Tommy Udo
08. Bernice
09. Soft and Easy
10. New Blue Ooze
11. Why Try (Single Version)
Written by:
≡★≡      Solomon Feldthouse     1, 9
≡★≡      David Lindley     2, 7
≡★≡      Connie Crill / Paul Lagos     3
≡★≡      Paul Lagos     4
≡★≡      Stuart Brotman / Connie Crill / Chris Darrow / Solomon Feldthouse / Paul Lagos / David Lindley     5
≡★≡      Stuart Brotman / Connie Crill / Paul Lagos / David Lindley     6
≡★≡      Connie Crill     8
≡★≡      Stuart Brotman / Connie Crill / Solomon Feldthouse / Paul Lagos / David Lindley     10
INCREDIBLE! Credits:
≡★≡      Bob Breault Engineer
≡★≡      Stuart Brotman Bass, Composer, Vocals
≡★≡      Max Buda Harmonica
≡★≡      Chester Burnett Composer
≡★≡      Tom Donahue Liner Notes
≡★≡      Fenrus Epp Keyboards, Violin
≡★≡      Solomon Feldthouse Clarinet, Composer, Guitar, Jumbus, Vocals
≡★≡      Howlin’ Wolf Composer
≡★≡      Paul Lagos Composer, Drums, Vocals
≡★≡      David Lindley Banjo, Composer, Guitar, Violin, Vocals
≡★≡      Jackie Mills Producer
≡★≡      Templeton Parcely Composer, Organ, Violin, Vocals
≡★≡      John Platt Liner Notes
≡★≡      Traditional Composer
BERNICE credits:
≡★≡      Robert Armstrong Musical Saw
≡★≡      Bob Breault Engineer
≡★≡      Stuart Brotman Bass, Composer, Vocals
≡★≡      Max Buda Harmonica
≡★≡      Connie Crill Composer, Keyboards
≡★≡      Chris Darrow Composer
≡★≡      Fenrus Epp Keyboards, Violin
≡★≡      Solomon Feldthouse Composer, Guitar, Vocals
≡★≡      Mark Freeman Engineer
≡★≡      Ron Johnson Bass
≡★≡      Jeff Kaplan Guitar, Vocals
≡★≡      Paul Lagos Composer, Drums, Percussion, Rap, Vocals, Voices
≡★≡      David Lindley Composer, Guitar, Violin, Vocals
≡★≡      Jackie Mills Producer
≡★≡      John Platt Liner Notes
Description:
≡★≡      Kaleidoscope were arguably the most eclectic band of the psychedelic era, weaving together folk, blues, Middle Eastern, and acid more often and seamlessly than any other musicians.
≡★≡      The California group were formed under the nucleus of multi~instrumentalists David Lindley and Chris Darrow in the mid~‘60s. Adding fiddle, banjo, and various exotic string instruments such as the oud and saz to the traditional rock lineup, Kaleidoscope complemented their experimental sounds with taut and witty (if lyrically eccentric) songwriting. Other important members were Solomon Feldthouse, who specialized in the Turkish~style instruments, and Chester Crill, who, to make documentation just that much more difficult, sometimes used odd pseudonyms like Fenrus Epp. With the exception of their mawkish forays into old~timey music, Kaleidoscope’s work holds up well. Their first three albums were their best, highlighted by the lengthy tracks “Taxim” and “Seven~Ate Sweet,” which are groundbreaking fusions of Middle Eastern music and rock. Kaleidoscope were a popular live act, even incorporating some flamenco and belly dancers into their performances. But in commercial terms their very eclecticism probably worked against them. Hit singles, too, were a difficult proposition for such a versatile group to get to grips with, although several of their 45s were pretty good. One of the best, “Nobody,” was a most unusual fusion of R&B and psychedelia that found the group backing veteran rock and blues greats Larry Williams and Johnny “Guitar” Watson.
≡★≡      Kaleidoscope’s eclecticism may have been a by~product of numerous personnel changes throughout the last half of the ‘60s that would make the construction of a family tree a most unwieldy task. Darrow, in fact, only lasted a couple of albums; in 1970, shortly after their fourth album, they split up. Several of the group’s more important contributors reunited for an album in 1975 (although Lindley played only a small part); there was another reunion record in 1988.
Incredible! 1969
AllMusic Review by Lindsay Planer; Score: ****½
≡★≡      Incredible! (1969) was the combo’s third album and first to boast contributions from newest members Stuart Brotman (bass/vocals) and Paul Lagos (percussion), flanking David Lindley (guitar/banjo/violin/vocals), Solomon Feldthouse (guitar/oud/clarinet/saz/jumbas/vocals), and Chester Crill (harmonica/violin/organ/vocal). In the absence of Chris Darrow’s commanding songwriting, each member projected himself into the material, which adopts a discernible country~rock lilt accompanying Kaleidoscope’s established Eastern~informed psychedelia. Nowhere do the two seemingly disparate styles fuse as effortlessly as the upbeat opener, “Lie to Me.” Similarly the rural feel of “Let the Good Love Flow” could be easily mistaken for the New Riders of the Purple Sage or Commander Cody, with Lindley pulling off a convincing faux steel guitar lead. On the other side of the spectrum is the funky workout on Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor,” as it slithers and slides around Lagos’ solid rhythm. The bayou~tinged “Petite Fleur” hearkens to a sound the band explored on the cover of Doug Kershaw’s “Louisiana Man” from their previous long~player, A Beacon from Mars. The appropriately titled “Banjo” provides Lindley with a vehicle for his remarkable virtuosity, likewise adding stimulation from Feldthouse’s strong East~meets~West vibe. The traditional “Cuckoo” is one of Kaleidoscope’s heavier numbers, reinforcing Lagos’ muscular interjections. The disc concludes with the lengthy and adeptly crafted “Seven~Ate Sweet,” a reference to the time signature of the 11~plus~minute instrumental. It offers nothing short of a consistently inspired example of the power and prowess within this incarnation. [Collectors and enthusiasts should take note of the Pulsating Dream (2004) anthology as it features all of the tracks Kaleidoscope recorded during their years on Epic (1967~1970).]
Kaleidoscope — Incredible / Bernice [Expanded Edition] (2018)                                    Bernice 1970
AllMusic Review by Stephen Raiteri;  Score: **
≡★≡      This desultory album (the band’s last before breaking up) shows the magic of the band seemingly overcome by lack of success, musical conflicts, and the collapse of enthusiasm that came with the end of the ‘60s. Bassist Stuart Brotman was out, the exotic instruments of the past are almost gone, and, according to John Platt in the liner notes to the Kaleidoscope compilation A Beacon from Mars, “Lindley, in particular, decided what he really wanted to play was R&B, perhaps the one style, at the time, he wasn’t good at.” The long instrumental that ends the album falls completely flat, as do attempts at humor: any fan of Kaleidoscope’s original “Little Orphan Annie,” a fun early B~side, will find its remake here as “Lulu Arfin Nanny,” sung by new recruit Jeff Kaplan, just painful.
Artist Biography by Richie Unterberger
≡★≡      Kaleidoscope were arguably the most eclectic band of the psychedelic era, weaving together folk, blues, Middle Eastern, and acid more often and seamlessly than any other musicians. The California group were formed under the nucleus of multi~instrumentalists David Lindley and Chris Darrow in the mid~‘60s. Adding fiddle, banjo, and various exotic string instruments such as the oud and saz to the traditional rock lineup, Kaleidoscope complemented their experimental sounds with taut and witty (if lyrically eccentric) songwriting. Other important members were Solomon Feldthouse, who specialized in the Turkish~style instruments, and Chester Crill, who, to make documentation just that much more difficult, sometimes used odd pseudonyms like Fenrus Epp.
≡★≡      With the exception of their mawkish forays into old~timey music, Kaleidoscope’s work holds up well. Their first three albums were their best, highlighted by the lengthy tracks “Taxim” and “Seven~Ate Sweet,” which are groundbreaking fusions of Middle Eastern music and rock. Kaleidoscope were a popular live act, even incorporating some flamenco and belly dancers into their performances. But in commercial terms their very eclecticism probably worked against them. Hit singles, too, were a difficult proposition for such a versatile group to get to grips with, although several of their 45s were pretty good. One of the best, “Nobody,” was a most unusual fusion of R&B and psychedelia that found the group backing veteran rock and blues greats Larry Williams and Johnny “Guitar” Watson.
≡★≡      Kaleidoscope’s eclecticism may have been a by~product of numerous personnel changes throughout the last half of the ‘60s that would make the construction of a family tree a most unwieldy task. Darrow, in fact, only lasted a couple of albums; in 1970, shortly after their fourth album, they split up. Several of the group's more important contributors reunited for an album in 1975 (although Lindley played only a small part); there was another reunion record in 1988.
≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★≡≡★ 

Kaleidoscope  Incredible / Bernice [Expanded Edition] (2018)

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