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Mount Kimbie Love What Survives
Warp (September 8, 2017)

Mount Kimbie — Love What Survives (8 Sept., 2017)

         Mount Kimbie — Love What Survives (8 Sept., 2017)   Mount Kimbie — Love What Survives (8 Sept., 2017)↑↓★↑↓     Mount Kimbie: Love What Survives review — electric wit and wisdom from London synth duo.   
Location: London, UK
Style: Electronic, Rock, Experimental
Album release: 8 Sept., 2017
Record Label: Warp
Duration:     39:34
Tracks:
01 Four Years and One Day     3:18
02 Blue Train Lines (feat. King Krule)     4:10
03 Audition     4:14
04 Marilyn (feat. Micachu)     4:07
05 SP12 Beat     2:33
06 You Look Certain (I’m Not So Sure) (feat. Andrea Balency)     3:22
07 Poison     1:54
08 We Go Home Together (feat. James Blake)     2:33
09 Delta     4:05
10 T.A.M.E.D     4:11
11 How We Got By (feat. James Blake)     5:07
Members: Dominic Maker, Kai CamposFotka uživatele Ben Tais Amundssen.Review
Katie Hawthorne | 04 Sep 2017 | Score: *****
Mount Kimbie’s third album, Love What Survives, offers a scattergun approach to ideas, sounds and voices, and it could be their greatest record yet.
↑↓★↑↓     Dominic Maker and Kai Campos have shape~shifted again. Their 2010 debut Crooks & Lovers was responsible for the shape of post~noughties UK electronic music, and two years later Cold Spring Fault Less Youth doubled down on their critical acclaim, but through live~instrumentation, introspective floor~fillers that blurred the lines between synthetic and organic sound.
↑↓★↑↓     For their third LP, Mount Kimbie have lost that previously razor sharp focus. Love What Survives offers a scattergun approach to ideas, sounds and voices, and it could be their greatest record yet. With a looser grip, Mount Kimbie dip and dive through myriad musical worlds, accompanied by some seriously talented pals. Micachu (aka BAFTA nominee Mica Levi), King Krule, Andrea Balency (the band’s live singer) and James Blake guest on tracks so diverse they barely fit on the same album… and yet.
↑↓★↑↓     Mount Kimbie have a gift for conjuring that unique, insular feeling of a world rushing by while you’re lost in your headphones, and that’s the key thread through Love What Survives. King Krule’s Archy Marshall spits out lyrics in brutal bursts on Blue Train Lines, over an anxious beat that ticks and ticks and ticks. The following instrumental track Audition heals those wounds with a woozy, nostalgia that starts out a lot like The Cure’s A Forest.
↑↓★↑↓     Blake’s cameo on the record’s last track is understated, as his unmistakable vocals and twinkly keys are near drowned out by submerged, watery synth. Listen to this record on loop, because when the opener kicks in again, and picks out abrupt, industrial rhythms from that same synthy gloom, you’ll see the logic in Mount Kimbie’s gentle chaos.   ↑↓★↑↓     http://www.theskinny.co.uk/Fotka uživatele Ben Tais Amundssen.    © Kai Campos (Frank Lebon), Archy Marshall (Scott Dudelson, Getty Images)          Also:
Rachel Aroesti  ↑↓★↑↓  Thursday 7 September 2017 21.30 BST  ↑↓★↑↓  Score: ****
↑↓★↑↓     Mount Kimbie: Love What Survives review — electric wit and wisdom from London synth duo.
↑↓★↑↓     In recent years, London duo Mount Kimbie have shrugged off their post~dubstep past and started to create songs that shepherd synth“heavy post~punk into the present day. On their third album, the band’s instrumentals radiate wit and warmth, like mid~80s New Order sloshing around in a sun~kissed sea — but it’s as a foil to some of Britain’s most idiosyncratic artists that Mount Kimbie really prove their mettle. Marilyn, their collaboration with Micachu, produces a masterly melange of outside~the~box melodies, James Blake’s hyper’emotional pipes meet creepily corrupted gospel on We Go Home Together, while the brilliant You Look Certain (I’m Not So Sure)’s chit~chatty vocals (courtesy of Andrea Balency, the band’s touring singer) recall post~punkers such as Vivien Goldman and the Raincoats. The record’s other highlight, Blue Train Lines, sees the duo reprise their hugely fruitful alliance with King Krule, artfully tempering the latter’s cracked howl with neat motorik drums and restrained synths that hover politely on the fringes of white noise. ↑↓★↑↓     https://www.theguardian.com/Fotka uživatele Ben Tais Amundssen.

© Shepherding synth~heavy post~punk into the now … Mount Kimbie. Photograph: Frank Lebon
Review
Words / Ryan Keeling / Score: 4.0/5
↑↓★↑↓     James Blake appears twice in the back half of the record, with the gospel “tinged “We Go Home Together” and “How We Got By,” the soul~soaked closer. Both are delicate and affecting, the type of snug collaborative fit you’d expect from artists who’ve known each for years, but it’s the link~up with Micachu that’s the album’s standout. “I’m looking up at you, yeah,” she sings, as the drums and bass gently patter beneath her and a gorgeous melody cascades through the arrangement. Collectively, the artists here represent a vanguard of leftfield UK pop that has its roots in London. Love What Survives won’t make Mount Kimbie household names, but it finds them in a new creative space that suits them. (excerpt)
↑↓★↑↓     https://www.residentadvisor.net/reviews/21393
Website: http://www.mountkimbie.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mountkimbie
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mountkimbie
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Mount Kimbie Love What Survives
Warp (September 8, 2017)

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