OK

Při poskytování služeb nám pomáhají soubory cookie. Používáním našich služeb vyjadřujete souhlas s naším používáním souborů cookie. Více informací

Úvodní stránka » GREAT BOOK TAIS AWARDS » Rokia Traoré — Né So
Rokia Traoré — Né So (2016)

Rokia Traoré — Né So (2016)

                             Rokia Traoré — Né So (2016)                                         ψ   Her outrage and sorrow are palpable. Né So is a sonically beautiful project, for sure, and it’s easy to get lost in the lilting rhythms and Traoré’s smoky voice. But if you’re simply sitting back with this album, you may have missed her point. Rokia Traore is an acclaimed singer/guitarist from Mali. Her label debut, 2009’s Tchamantché, won an award at the Victoires de la Musique (the equivalent of a Grammy Award in France) and a Songlines Artist of the Year Award for Traoré. Beautiful Africa debuted on the Billboard World Music Charts at #1. Uncut described it as “the record fans of [Traoré’s] explosive live shows always hoped she would make; a career highpoint.”                                                                                                                          Born: January 26, 1974 in Beledougou, Mali
Location: Kolokani, Mali
Album release: 2016
Record Label: Nonesuch
Duration:
Tracks:
01 Tu Voles     4:04 
02 Obikè     4:27 
03 Kènia     5:17 
04 Amour     3:06 
05 Mayé     5:35 
06 Ilé     3:54 
07 Ô Niélé     3:26 
08 Kolokani     4:06 
09 Strange Fruit     3:40 
10 Né So     3:53 
11 Sé Dan     4:07   
CREDITS
MUSICIANS
ψ   Rokia Traoré, lead vocal (1–11), guitar 2 (1–6, 8, 10, 11), backing vocals (1–4, 6, 7, 8, 11), guitar (7), guitar 1 (8)
ψ   Stefano Pilia, guitar 1 (1–6, 9– 11)
ψ   John Parish, guitar 3 (1, 4), drums (9), vocal (10)
ψ   Mamah Diabaté, ngoni (1–6, 9–11)
ψ   Matthieu Nguessan, bass guitar (1–6, 10, 11)
ψ   Moïse Ouatara, drums (1–6, 10, 11), percussion (10)
ψ   Bule Mpania, Russell Tshiebua, backing vocals (1–4, 6)
ψ   Rodriguez Vangama, guitar 3 (2, 3)
ψ   John Paul Jones, bass guitar (7), mandolin (10)
ψ   John Parish, drums (7)
ψ   Stéfy Rika, backing vocals (7, 8, 11)
ψ   Reggie Washington, bass guitar (9)
ψ   Devendra Banhart, guitar 3 (11), lead vocal (11)
PRODUCTION CREDITS
ψ   Produced by John Parish
ψ   Recorded by Ali Chant at Jet Studio, Brussels, Belgium, and Toybox Studios, Bristol, UK
ψ   Mixed by John Parish & Ali Chant
ψ   Mastered at Loud Mastering, Taunton, UK
ψ   Design by Barbara de Wilde
ψ   Photography by Danny Willems                                                                                  01.) Ô NIELÉ
Bass guitar : John Paul Jones
Drums : John Parish
Guitare : Rokia Traoré
Lead vocal : Rokia Traoré
Backing vocals : Rokia Traoré ; Stéfy Rika
02.) O BIKÈ
Guitare 1 : Stefano Pilia
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Guitar 3 : Rodriguez Vangama
Ngoni : Mamah Diabaté
Bass guitar : Matthieu Nguessan
Drums : Moïse Ouatara
Lead vocal : Rokia Traoré
Backing vocals : Rokia Traoré, Bule Mpania , Russell Tshiebua
03.) ILÉ
Guitare 1 : Stefano Pilia
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Ngoni : Mamah Diabaté
Bass guitar : Matthieu Nguessan
Drums : Moïse Ouatara
Lead vocal : Rokia Traoré
Backing vocals : Rokia Traoré, Bule Mpania , Russell Tshiebua
04.) KÈNYA
Guitare 1 : Stefano Pilia
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Guitar 3 : Rodriguez Vangama
Ngoni : Mamah Diabaté
Bass guitar : Matthieu Nguessan
Drums : Moïse Ouatara
Lead vocal : Rokia Traoré
Backing vocals : Rokia Traoré, Bule Mpania , Russell Tshiebua
05.) MAYÉ
Guitare 1 : Stefano Pilia
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Ngoni : Mamah Diabaté
Bass guitar : Matthieu Nguessan
Drums : Moïse Ouatara
Vocals : Rokia Traoré
06.) NÉ SO
Guitare 1 : Stefano Pilia
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Ngoni : Mamah Diabaté
Mandoline : John Paul Jones
Bass guitar : Matthieu Nguessan
Drums & percussion: Moïse Ouatara
Vocals : Rokia Traoré ; John Parish
07.) KOLOKANI
Guitare 1 : Rokia Traoré
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Lead vocal : Rokia TRoaré
Backing vocals : Rokia Traoré ; Stéfy Rika
08.) TU VOLES     4:06
Guitare 1 : Stefano Pilia
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Ngoni : Mamah Diabaté
Guitar 3 : John Parish
Bass guitar : Matthieu Nguessan
Drums : Moïse Ouatara
Lead vocal : Rokia Traoré
Backing vocals : Rokia Traoré, Bule Mpania , Russell Tshiebua
09.) AMOUR AMOUR     3:40
Guitare 1 : Stefano Pilia
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Ngoni : Mamah Diabat
Bass guitar : Matthieu Nguessan
Drums : Moïse Ouatara
Vocals : Rokia Traoré
10.) SÉ DAN     3:53
Guitare 1 : Stefano Pilia
Guitare 2 : Rokia Traoré
Guitar 3 : Devendra Banhart
Ngoni : Mamah Diabaté
Mandoline : John Paul Jones
Bass guitar : Matthieu Nguessan
Drums : Moïse Ouatara
Lead vocal : Rokia Traoré ; Devendra Banhart
Backing vocals : Rokia Traoré ; Stéfy Rika
11.) STRANGE FRUIT     4:06
Guitare1 : Stefano Pilia
Bass guitar : Reggie Washington
Ngoni : Mamah Diabaté
Drums : John Parish
Vocals : Rokia Traoré
Credits:
Artistic production : John Parish
Music and lyrics : Rokia Traoré
Sound engineer : Aslister Chant ; Pierre Dozin
Photos : Danny Willems
Recording studio : JET STUDIO ; TOY BOX STUDIO
Mastering : LOUD MASTERING
℗ 2016 ROCK’A SOUND                                                                     AllMusic Review by Timothy Monger;  Score: ****
ψ   Just prior to her last release, 2013’s fiery rock–oriented Beautiful Africa, Malian singer/songwriter Rokia Traoré’s home country suffered a military coup that launched the nation into a brutal civil war and political unrest that continues to smolder three years later. It’s no wonder then that Traoré’s sixth album, Né So, is a more subdued affair, rife with new tensions and deeply affecting meditations on identity and the meaning of home. Produced again by Britain’s John Parish (PJ Harvey), the sonic scope of Né So is more intimate and tightly wound than its predecessor, filled with subtle grooves and some inventive guitar work from both Traoré and her two very capable six–string counterparts, Stefano Pilia and Rodriguez Vangama. Weaving in and out of this mix is longtime collaborator Mamah Diabaté, who adds nimble flourishes on the n’goni, especially on songs like the masterful “Kènia” and the pensive title track, whose haunting lyrics tell of the millions of Malian refugees forced to leave their homes in 2014. Traoré’s voice has always seemed to be both brittle and strangely electric, and she delivers these powerful songs in a worldly mix of Bambara, French, and even English, as on her heartrending cover of “Strange Fruit,” Abel Meeropol’s 1937 anti–racist ballad originally made famous by Billie Holiday. Traoré’s confidence and emotional candor drive her music, adding heft to the anti–war themed “Ilé,” or a lush resonance to the romantic “Amour.” Guest artists like Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones and California psych–folk bard Devendra Banhart represent her expansive, multi–cultural breadth, though their contributions are hardly necessary, as this already comes through in her music. With Né So, Traoré feels completely dialed in and in control, delivering her most compelling record yet.
Discography:
                                             BEL (Vl) / BEL (Wa) / FR
1998 Mouneïssa               —                —                   —
2000 Wanita                     —                —                   —
2003 Bowmboï                 —                —                   43
2008 Tchamantché         76              63                   35
2013 Beautiful Africa     86            120                   66
2016 Né So                          —                —                    —
“Un but doit avoir sa raison
A la base de toute réussite il y a une raison
A la base de tout échec il y a un but sans raison.”
ψ   Tels sont les mots, fiévreusement chantés en bambara, qui ouvrent Kenia, l’un des titres de Né So (“Chez moi”), le sixième album de Rokia Traoré. A eux seuls, ils résument la force qui meut la Malienne dans son périple musical, entamé il y a près de vingt ans. Il y a mille façons d’entrer en musique : pour accomplir un plan de carrière, pour répondre à une urgence intérieure, pour gagner un peu de reconnaissance, pour transmettre une tradition… Et puis il y a le chemin tracé par Rokia Traoré, qui depuis son premier album, Mouneïssa, cultive son art pour suivre et développer une véritable philosophie de vie — une morale, si l’on veut, au sens le moins rigide, le plus empirique et ouvert du terme.
ψ   Une philosophie en action, forgée à l’épreuve des faits et motivée par les éclairs de la volonté et les élans du coeur. Une philosophie qui, toujours, place en son centre la question fondamentale des choix et des responsabilités.
ψ   Avant chacun de ses albums et projets, Rokia Traoré se demande ainsi comment et pourquoi continuer à faire oeuvre de musicienne. Cette fois ci, cette interrogation s’est imposée à elle de manière plus aiguë encore. C’est que l’existence l’a entrainée dans l’une de ces zones de turbulences dont elle a l’imprévisible secret, et où l’intime et le collectif viennent brutalement se télescoper. En 2012 au Mali — où cette enfant de diplomate, rompue depuis toujours à une vie d’itinérance, avait choisi de se réinstaller trois ans auparavant —, Rokia Traoré s’est ainsi retrouvée comme ses compatriotes aux premières loges d’un chaos qui, bientôt, allait se muer en conflit armé. “Cette situation de pays en guerre m’a bouleversée, et m’a fait perdre une naïveté que je ne me soupçonnais pas. Je me suis rendue compte que j’étais encore très candide”, dit–elle aujourd’hui. Obligée de quitter un temps Bamako et de revenir en Europe avec son fils, Rokia Traoré a aussi dû affronter les tourments d’un évènement de vie qui, dans ses prolongements, aura remis en cause son statut et sa légitimité mêmes de musicienne. “Pour simplifier un peu, être une femme artiste, de surcroît Africaine vivant en Afrique, rend peu crédible en tant que mère”, résume–t–elle. Les bouleversements en cours dans le monde musical et l’industrie du disque ont achevé de déposer Rokia Traoré à la croisée de tous les doutes.
ψ   Songeant un moment à refermer le chapitre de sa vie d’artiste, elle aura pourtant trouvé l’énergie de ne pas se laisser envahir par le désenchantement. “Tout tombait en même temps, raconte–t–elle. Il n’est jamais agréable de traverser des expériences difficiles, mais c’est aussi ce qui aide à grandir, à comprendre pourquoi on s’accroche ou renonce à certaines choses… Est venu un moment où j’ai compris que j’allais soit y arriver, soit allonger la liste des chanteuses qui finissent mal, et sur lesquelles on écrit des livres où il n’est même plus question de musique ni de talent, mais seulement de déchirements personnels… Je me suis demandée si c’était dans ce genre d’ouvrage que j’avais envie de me retrouver, ou si je voulais prendre le risque de continuer. Il y avait vraiment des décisions à prendre ; et je les ai prises, avec grand plaisir.”
ψ   Cet art du rebond nourrit en filigrane toute la trame de Né So. Ecrit et composé en solitaire, puis répété à Bamako, enregistré à Bruxelles et Bristol avec des musiciens auditionnés dans tout l’Ouest africain (“Je n’ai pas voulu d’un groupe uniquement constitué de Maliens, car j’ai besoin de différences et de brassages culturels autour de moi”), l’album représente pour son auteure autant un retour aux bases qu’un nouveau pas en avant. “On peut dire que le Mali, d’une certaine façon, est ma base, en effet : c’est là que je me réfugie quand beaucoup de questions se posent, c’est là que j’assume de prendre des risques quand il le faut… A Bamako, j’ai senti que j’aurais la possibilité d’être à la fois libre etentourée. Né So, dans un sens, me rappelle mon premier album, car, pour pouvoir continuer, j’ai dû littéralement tout reprendre à zéro, réorganiser mon fonctionnement sans même me demander si ce que j’entreprenais allait marcher ou pas. Ce retour aux sources motivé par les circonstances m’a renvoyée à l’époque où, arrêtant mes études en Belgique, j’étais retournée au Mali pour faire de la musique. Mais cette fois, j’ai eupour moi l’avantage de l’expérience. Le bénéfice de l’âge, c’est de pouvoir travailler sans être possédé par la crainte de perdre la renommée relative qu’on a construite. Ce qui amène à des choix libres, spontanés — des choix directement liés à tout ce que j’aime dans la musique.”
ψ   Avec un ensemble composé du batteur burkinabé Moïse Ouatara, du bassiste ivoirien Matthieu N’guessan, du joueur de ngoni malien Mamah Diabaté — un complice de la première heure — ou encore de choristes formés dans sa Fondation Passerelle de Bamako, Rokia Traoré ancre Né So dans le terreau musical de cette “beautiful Africa” dont elle chantait les louanges dans son précédent album. Mais sans cesser de perpétuer sa volonté d’étendre son horizon expressif — depuis les mélopées mandingues jusqu’aux sonorités rock, depuis la langue bambara jusqu’à l’anglais ou le français — ni d’étancher sa soif de rencontres et de partages. Respectivement à la direction artistique et à la guitare, l’Anglais John Parish (qui manie également ici et là batterie) et l’Italien Stefano Pilia apportent leurs oreilles expertes et attentives, qui avaient déjà magnifié les plages de Beautiful Africa. Rencontré en 2012 lors de la tournée du collectif Africa Express, le producteur, arrangeur et multiinstrumentiste John Paul Jones (Led Zeppelin, Them Crooked Vultures…) vient apposer traits de basse et de mandoline. La guitare et la voix du songwriter américain Devendra Banhart, autre pensionnaire du label Nonesuch, s’invite aussi dans Sé Dan : une célébration en anglais de la force d’empathie du genre humain, sur laquelle plane la présence bienveillante du Prix Nobel de littérature Toni Morrison, qui a posé sur le texte ses lumières d’écrivain et d’humaniste. Ample et subtile, la diversité de ce générique dit une fois encore la capacité qu’a Rokia Traoré de composer une palette humaine et esthétique à même d’épouser ses visions. “J’ai besoin de collaborations qui reposent sur des valeurs communes, précise–t–elle. Parler du monde seule, je n’en ai pas envie : je veux pouvoir le faire avec des gens avec lesquels je partage des convictions.”
ψ   Le monde, selon Rokia Traoré, est à l’image des pièces qui composent Né So, et notamment de sa chanson–titre qui, telle une saisissante eauforte, décrit en quelques strophes la détresse des peuples déracinés de force… Chargé de douleurs et de joies, traversé d’épreuves et d’espoirs, il est couvé par un regard qui, même dans la plus grande adversité, refuse de céder à la tentation de la dramatisation comme de la résignation. De Amour, Amour, Tu voles ou Obiké, odes à la légèreté d’être et au plaisir de vivre, à Ilé, ritournelle où s’exprime une sainte détestation des conflits et querelles d’ego, de Kolokani, hommage à la beauté des sources et des aïeux, à Niélé, hymne au courage des jeunes femmes en devenir, Rokia Traoré fait vibrer plus que jamais ce désir impérieux, ce mouvement vital qui, comme sur une ligne de crête, la conduit à partir de son expérience individuelle pour mieux embrasser l’expérience collective. La reprise aussi terrienne qu’aérienne de Strange Fruit, nouvel emprunt au répertoire  de Billie Holiday (après The Man I Love sur l’album Tchamantché), résonne comme le point d’orgue de cette démarche. Dans ce récit toujours empoignant de la folie haineuse des hommes, mis en écho aux crispations et durcissements de notre époque, la voix de Rokia Traoré, entremêlant recueillement et ferveur, exprime l’humble subjectivité d’une artiste qui, depuis sa position de témoin, se replace dans le contexte de l’humanité, de cette humanité qui l’enrobe et la dépasse tout à la fois. “Je crois que c’est dans ce mouvement–là, du cas particulier au cas général, que je tiens — et qu’on tient tous — le coup. C’est peut–être ça, la maturité : aimer une vie où l’on n’est pas toujours au centre de sa propre vie…”
ψ   Dans ces mots résident sans nul doute la raison et le but de Né So : Rokia Traoré s’y invente un “chez soi” qui invite à regarder le monde et la condition humaine tels qu’ils vont, dans toute la gamme de leurs complexités, de leurs difficultés et de leurs beautés.
Website: http://www.rokiatraore.net/
Label: http://www.nonesuch.com/ne-so

ψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψψ

Rokia Traoré — Né So (2016)

NEWS

19.8.2017

Natalie Merchant

18.8.2017

Ray Wylie Hubbard

18.8.2017

UNCUT TAKE 245

18.8.2017

VERTIGO

18.8.2017

Rusalnaia

18.8.2017

Gary Clark Jr.

18.8.2017

The Duke Spirit

archiv

ALBUM COVERS IX.

The Duke Spirit — Sky is Mine (August 17th, 2017)
Tais Awards & Harvest Prize
Za Zelenou liškou 140 00 Praha 4, CZE
+420608841540